Earth Observatory Blog

Submitted on 24 Jan 2017 by:

Last December, a big contingent from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) travelled to the American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference, the largest gathering of earth and space scientists in the world. Around 24,000 people descended upon San Francisco to catch up with colleagues, present their research, and learn about the latest advancements in their fields. 

The Community Engagement Office set up a booth to share our work with conference-goers. EOS professors, research fellows, and graduate students graciously volunteered to speak with curious visitors about their experiences and research in Singapore.

The EOS wine reception kicked off the week. Late into the night, EOS...

Submitted on 22 Dec 2016 by:

In March, we kicked off the EOS Institutional Blog. Our goal – create a space for you to learn more about what our scientists and teams are up to. As I look back on the stories we shared covering new research, current hazardous activity in the region, and outreach events, I’m thrilled to have the Institutional Blog as a reminder of the great work we’ve done and the fruitful year we’ve had.

Publications, workshops, awards, marine research and a lot of seismic activity kept us steeped in stories. This year was particularly active throughout the region with more than nine major earthquakes garnering our attention and interest.  From the M 6.2 earthquake near the Java Trench to the...

Submitted on 24 Nov 2016 by:

The recent powerful quakes that devastated the northeastern coast of New Zealand’s South Island on 14 Nov 2016 may be part of a pattern emerging for large strike-slip fault earthquakes all around the world.

The New Zealand quakes are significant, because they did not occur on the country’s largest plate-boundary fault line, the Alpine Fault. They instead occurred on smaller nearby faults, and this is something that is happening to other such faults, most notably California’s San Andreas Fault.

New Zealand’s Alpine Fault is a 600-kilometre right-lateral strike-slip fault that forms the main boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Its plate movements, considered to be fast by global standards, at ≈ 3 centimetres per year, forged and shaped the Southern...