Earth Observatory Blog

05 Apr 2016

Parkfield, population 18, sits on the San Andreas Fault in central California. Besides a café and grazing cattle, the town hosts a dense array of seismic instruments that measure tremors deep below Earth’s surface. The small quakes repeat every few days and act as a model for similar faults around the world.

13 Mar 2016

Asia and the Pacific are most at risk from natural disasters, according to a report from the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction. More than 90 million people worldwide were affected by natural disasters in 2015. Asia is the world’s most disaster-prone continent, with 152 out of the 346 reported disasters worldwide. This isn’t surprising, given that it is both geologically active and the most populous region on Earth. In the last few decades, earthquakes, tsunamis, and typhoons were among the deadliest natural hazards in the world. In 2015, earthquakes topped the list; the magnitude 7.8 Nepal earthquake in April claimed more than 8,000 lives, causing widespread damage in Gorkha and its surrounding areas. Earlier this year, the earthquake in Taiwan saw more than a hundred...

11 Mar 2016

In a paper published in Geology, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Geological Society of America, Associate Professor Fidel Costa from the Earth Observatory of Singapore and colleagues Helena Albert and Joan Martí from the Central Geophysical Observatory in Spain found that monogenetic eruptions could be anticipated by a combination of seismic and petrological observations.

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