Commentaries

800 Million Tons of Blue Carbon Lie Buried in US Tidal Wetlands

Tidal wetlands in the contiguous US can store roughly 800 million tons of carbon in their soils. That is the latest estimate from a team of over 30 scientists, including Professor Benjamin Horton and Dr Tim Shaw from the Earth Observatory of Singapore and the Asian School of the Environment, published on 21 June 2018 in Nature Scientific Reports.

  • EOS News
18 Jun 2018

In the video below, Assistant Professor Wei Shengji, Principal Investigator at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, suggests that the earthquake tha

How Long Does it Take to Build a Caldera-Sized Magma Reservoir?

Some eruptions are so large, and discharge so much magma (molten rock), that the roof of the magma chamber can no longer support itself. When the roof collapses, it forms a big hole in the ground called a caldera. One such volcano is Santorini, in Greece, whose distinctive ring shape was formed by multiple caldera collapses.

Slipping Towards a Better Understanding of How Earthquakes are Generated

Earthquakes continue to cause tremendous damage and casualties around the world. Contrary to other geophysical hazards, such as storms and floods, seismic hazards still elude short-term prediction. This is due, on the one hand, to our limited understanding of how rocks deform and break; and on the other hand, by the difficulty of probing Earth's interior to determine the physical parameters of a given fault.

2017 in Review

Dear EOS Community,

As the year comes to a close, I’d like to thank you for your continued interest and support in the research, initiatives and programs being conducted here at the Earth Observatory. Over the past year, your increased engagement has helped us to better understand your interests in geohazard research and provide content to meet them. From publications to awards and new blog series, here is a look back on a few highlights from 2017.

Communicating Climate Change

Climate change is a complex issue, which is challenging to communicate. Yet our understanding of it is crucial for the future of our world. Sonali Manimaran, a student at the Asian School of the Environment, explains the need for climate change communication that goes beyond facts and figures in order to more fully engage the public.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Commentaries