Natural Disasters

  • EOS News
19 Jan 2018

Mayon, on Luzon Island in the Philippines, entered a new eruptive phase on 13 January 2018, according to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS), Philippines’ Geological Agency. This phase included steam-driven eruptions and flows from a new lava dome growing at the summit of the volcano.

Today's Quake in Myanmar is a Reminder of How Active the Sagaing Fault is

Very early in the morning on Friday, 12 January 2018, Myanmar was struck by a magnitude-6.0 earthquake. Residents in the two capital cities, Yangon and Nay Pyi Taw, were able to feel the quake that had originated 40 kilometres west of the Sagaing Fault in Central Myanmar.

In the video below, Dr Wang Yu, a Research Fellow at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, suggests that today’s earthquake is a reminder of how active the Sagaing Fault actually is. 

  • EOS News
28 Nov 2017

Agung Volcano is currently erupting.

After over one month of intense seismic activity, during which the alert level at Agung was 4 (the highest), on 29 October 2017, at 4:00pm local time, the alert level was lowered to 3 (eruption imminent). This was due to a strong decrease in the number of earthquakes surrounding Agung, as well as a reduction in the seismic energy and amplitude of these quakes. 

Post-Disaster Damage Assessments: Room for Improvement?

On 25 April 2015, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, destroying buildings and infrastructure across 31 of Nepal’s 70 districts. Approximately 9,000 people lost their lives to the earthquake that day, 22,000 suffered from injuries, and eight million were affected. I arrived in Kathmandu one week after the quake to support the government of Nepal in various response and recovery activities.

New York City at Risk of Flooding Every Decade - Climate Study Shows

Our Earth is warming. In fact, the planet’s average temperature has risen by 0.6°C over the past century, and is projected to rise another 2 to 6°C over the next hundred years. Small changes in the average temperature of the planet can translate to large and potentially dangerous shifts in climate and weather.

How did the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Change Earth’s Rotation?

The devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake in northeastern Japan was a record-breaker on many levels. The magnitude-9.0 quake was Japan’s largest recorded and the world’s fourth biggest earthquake since 1900. Most terribly, it unleashed a 39-metre high tsunami, killing almost 16,000 people and causing a nuclear meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

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