Publication

Where Should We Rebuild After a Disaster?

In 2004, a devastating tsunami struck coastlines around the Indian Ocean. In a study of the long-term recovery of the city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, we found that reconstruction aid provided mostly near the coast, combined with many people's preferences to move to safer areas instead, has had the unintended consequence whereby the poor have become disproportionately exposed to coastal hazards.

The Fate of Water on Mars

When searching for life, scientists begin by looking for the key element that sustains it: fresh water. Although today’s Martian surface is barren, frozen and inhospitable, a trail of evidence points to a once warmer, wetter planet, where water flowed freely. The mystery of what happened to this water is long-standing and unsolved. However, our new research, published on 21 December in Nature, suggests that this water is now locked in Martian rocks.

Post-Disaster Damage Assessments: Room for Improvement?

On 25 April 2015, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, destroying buildings and infrastructure across 31 of Nepal’s 70 districts. Approximately 9,000 people lost their lives to the earthquake that day, 22,000 suffered from injuries, and eight million were affected. I arrived in Kathmandu one week after the quake to support the government of Nepal in various response and recovery activities.

New York City at Risk of Flooding Every Decade - Climate Study Shows

Our Earth is warming. In fact, the planet’s average temperature has risen by 0.6°C over the past century, and is projected to rise another 2 to 6°C over the next hundred years. Small changes in the average temperature of the planet can translate to large and potentially dangerous shifts in climate and weather.

Measuring the Strength of Crustal Rocks From Outer Space

New research from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) recently published in Science introduces an exciting new technique for discerning the strength of rocks in the earth’s continental lower crust. The method we developed allows us to make inferences about the properties of rocks where they are buried. Our study also provides the first low-frequency tomographic image of rheological properties beneath Kyushu, Japan. Tomography allows us to see the internal properties of the rock, section by section.

Seismic Activity and Magmatic Intrusions may Forecast Monogenetic Eruptions

In a paper published in Geology, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Geological Society of America, Associate Professor Fidel Costa from the Earth Observatory of Singapore and colleagues Helena Albert and Joan Martí from the Central Geophysical Observatory in Spain found that monogenetic eruptions could be anticipated by a combination of seismic and petrological observations.

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