Earth Observatory Blog

17 Apr 2019

When the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) first decided to create educational materials about the earth sciences, all we knew then was that we wanted something extra fun, immersive, and highly interactive. The EOS Dynamic Earth Games that we have now were not yet in our minds.

10 Apr 2019

Did my last blog post about the Dynamic Earth Games (DEG) leave you hungry for more details about the games? Well, I hope to satisfy your curiosity in this second post.

03 Apr 2019

What makes up the exciting memories of my first interaction with science? I recall touching the slimy texture of snails, sniffing ammonia salt (also known as “smelly salt”), and making my sister’s hair stand with a balloon.

20 Mar 2019

What lies beneath Singapore?

With land in scarce supply, Singapore is increasingly looking underground for storage spaces and even city construction. A team from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) have started working on a seismic survey to find out more about Singapore’s underground seismic structure and seismic hazard.

12 Mar 2019

Scientists at the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) and Asian School of the Environment (ASE), at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), and collaborating institutions National University of Singapore and University of Colorado, have demonstrated the potential to use GPS (more generally known as GNSS) technology to track storm surges in coastal settings.

04 Mar 2019

Scientists from Academia Sinica (Taiwan) and the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) have published a study in Science Advances, using a technique developed at EOS for discerning the strength of rocks in Earth’s continental lower crust.

18 Feb 2019

On 29 July 2018, Lombok was struck by a 6.4 magnitude earthquake, killing 20 people. A week later, an even stronger earthquake of magnitude 6.9 devasted the island. Strong aftershocks continued to rock the Indonesian island, quickly transforming the popular tourist paradise into “hell on earth”.

12 Feb 2019

The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) continued to have a strong presence at the annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference in December 2018.

25 Jan 2019

Magma commonly moves up towards the surface by creating cracks in the crust. It flows inside of the cracks, which grow upwards as the magma applies pressure and damages surrounding rocks. These magma-filled cracks are known as dikes and they are an important form which allows magma to travel easily through the crust.

27 Dec 2018

At approximately 9:30pm local time (2:30pm GMT) on the 22ndDecember 2018, a tsunami struck Indonesia’s Sunda Strait, which lies between the islands of Java and Sumatra, claiming over 430 lives. According to Indonesia’s disaster agency there are at least 1,500 injured, over 120 people still missing, and around 12,000 people have been displaced.

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