Earth Observatory Blog

04 Mar 2019

Scientists from Academia Sinica (Taiwan) and the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) have published a study in Science Advances, using a technique developed at EOS for discerning the strength of rocks in Earth’s continental lower crust.

18 Feb 2019

On 29 July 2018, Lombok was struck by a 6.4 magnitude earthquake, killing 20 people. A week later, an even stronger earthquake of magnitude 6.9 devasted the island. Strong aftershocks continued to rock the Indonesian island, quickly transforming the popular tourist paradise into “hell on earth”.

12 Feb 2019

The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) continued to have a strong presence at the annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference in December 2018.

25 Jan 2019

Magma commonly moves up towards the surface by creating cracks in the crust. It flows inside of the cracks, which grow upwards as the magma applies pressure and damages surrounding rocks. These magma-filled cracks are known as dikes and they are an important form which allows magma to travel easily through the crust.

27 Dec 2018

At approximately 9:30pm local time (2:30pm GMT) on the 22 December 2018, a tsunami struck Indonesia’s Sunda Strait, which lies between the islands of Java and Sumatra, claiming over 430 lives. According to Indonesia’s disaster agency there are at least 1,500 injured, over 120 people still missing, and around 12,000 people have been displaced.

20 Dec 2018

Dear EOS Community,

What a busy and exciting year for the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS). In early 2018, we kicked off the celebration of our 10thyear as a Research of Excellence at the Nanyang Techonological University (NTU). Marking a decade of geohazard research in Asia, EOS has built a team of outstanding scientists and staff to move the institution forward for years to come.

10 Dec 2018

Even though sea-level rise (SLR) has been studied by scientists for more than 35 years in over 70 individual studies, global and local SLR projections remain uncertain. 

14 Nov 2018

On Sunday (29 July 2018), I learnt about the strong 6.4-magnitude (M) earthquake in Lombok, Indonesia. As we have friends living there, I wanted to visit to see what aid we could organise for the people there. So my husband and I went to Lombok with some friends, and we linked up with other humanitarian aid groups to visit the Sembalun area, which is about 1,000 metres above sea level, at the foothills of Mount Rinjani, one of the most scenic volcanoes in the world.

24 Oct 2018

Let’s face it – the use of plastics has been our way of life. How many of us (at least those in our twenties) can recall going to the wet market with our parents when we were young without using a single plastic bag? Probably none. That’s the way we were brought up.

But just because something has become habitual and is a social norm does not mean that it is right, or that it has to stay that way.

10 Oct 2018

Published in Nature Geosciences on 1 October 2018, new research by a team of scientists from the Victoria University of Wellington and the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) has revealed how understanding the events leading up to the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake may lead to a different approach to forecasting earthquakes.

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