Calendar

August 2019

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Conference Asia Oceania Geosciences Society 16th Annual Meeting

Asia Oceania Geosciences Society 16th Annual Meeting

Conference

Date: Mon, 2019-07-29 09:00 to Fri, 2019-08-02 18:00
Venue: SUNTEC Singapore Level 3

About the Event

 

The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) and the Asian School of the Environment (ASE) are proud to attend the Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS) 16th Annual Meeting held in Singapore.

The Community Engagement Office will also be hosting outreach activities at their booth, located at A06 at the exhibitors' hall, level 3.

EOS and ASE are represented by 42 presenters giving a total of 47 oral and poster presentations, as well as a workshop. The full EOS and ASE presentation schedule can be viewed below, and is also available for download in a PDF format.

 

 

 




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09:00 to 18:00
 
 
 
 
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Seminar
Developing Regional Tephrostratigraphic Frameworks: Applications and Challenges

Developing Regional Tephrostratigraphic Frameworks: Applications and Challenges

Seminar
Speaker: Dr. Karen Fontijn
Date: Tue, 2019-08-06 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Viz Laboratory Room (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

Detailed stratigraphic studies of pyroclastic deposits form arguably the best tool to estimate the frequency and magnitude of explosive eruptions at volcanoes where limited or no historical records exist. As such, tephrostratigraphy forms a first-order assessment of potential future eruptive behavior at poorly known volcanoes. Alternations of soils and pyroclastic deposits at proximal to medial distances of the volcano however typically only allow reconstructing eruptive behavior within the Holocene. Moreover, they only tend to preserve relatively large explosive eruptions, of magnitude 3-4 and above, and therefore almost invariably form a biased view of the frequency-magnitude relationships at a particular volcano. Long lacustrine records in medial to distal regions offer significant potential to obtain a more complete view of the explosive eruptive record as they often preserve thin fine-grained tephra deposits representing either small-scale explosive eruptions not preserved on land, or distal ash deposits from large explosive eruptions. Furthermore, these sedimentary records often contain material that can be dated to establish a detailed age-depth model that can be used to date the eruptions and estimate the tempo of activity.

In settings where volcanoes and lakes closely co-exist, integrating terrestrial and lacustrine data therefore allows the development of regional-scale tephrostratigraphic frameworks. Such frameworks provide a view of temporal trends in volcanic activity and mid/long-term eruptive rates on a regional scale rather than at the level of an individual volcano, i.e. in interaction with regional tectonic stress regimes. They also highlight the spatial distribution of deposits from large explosive eruptions, allowing improved estimates of magnitudes of individual eruptions as well as of frequency of impact by volcanic ash in specific regions. Provided such tephra horizons are well characterized and dated they can be used as age marker horizons and help fine-tune age models for palaeoenvironmental studies. In this presentation I will highlight a few key examples of both local and regional-scale tephrostratigraphic frameworks in Indonesia, Chile and Ethiopia, and discuss the multidisciplinary applications as well as challenges posed by data acquisition.



Dr. Karen Fontijn

Dr Karen Fontijn obtained her Ph.D from Ghent University, Belgium and spent her post-doc at the Earth Observatory of Singapore and the University of Oxford, UK. As a physical volcanologist, she has worked on various volcanoes in different tectonic settings, from rift volcanoes in Tanzania and Ethiopia, to oceanic and continental arc volcanoes in the Philippines, Indonesia and Chile.


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Dr. Karen Fontijn
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
Workshop Workshop on Advances in Tephrochronology

Workshop on Advances in Tephrochronology

Workshop

Date: Wed, 2019-08-07 09:00 to Thu, 2019-08-08 18:00
Venue: Nanyang Technological University

About the Event




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09:00 to 18:00
 
 
 
 
 
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Symposium
Melting Ice and Plastic Seas

Melting Ice and Plastic Seas

Symposium

Date: Fri, 2019-08-16 15:30 to 17:00
Venue: Lecture Theatre 19A, NTU

About the Event

The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) at Nanyang Technological University invites you to a very special event featuring world-renowned Oceanographer Dr Sylvia Earle as the keynote speaker for the Symposium: Melting Ice & Plastic Seas. In collaboration with Ocean Geographic’s Elysium Epic Trilogy, the symposium includes presentations by Ocean Geographic Society’s Director Michael Aw and Science Editor Alex Rose. The panel of science experts and ocean advocates, including EOS’s Prof Benjamin Horton, will discuss climate change and plastic pollution. As our planet faces unprecedented challenges, forces are converging to develop solutions that will give hope for its future. Please join us as we explore the issues in Melting Ice & Plastic Seas, by registering your attendance here.




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15:30 to 17:00
 
 
Seminar
Efficiency of geophysical survey in evaluating the bedrock configuration and aquifer extent in St. Martin’s island, Bangladesh

Efficiency of geophysical survey in evaluating the bedrock configuration and aquifer extent in St. Martin’s island, Bangladesh

Seminar
Speaker: Md. Golam Muktadir
Date: Fri, 2019-08-16 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

St. Martin's island is the only coral-bearing offshore island in Bangladesh; it supports a population of thousands. Groundwater in the shallow subsurface is the only source of potable water on the island. However, the extent (both lateral and vertical), distribution and geometry of the aquifer are unknown. 

Seismic refraction (12 channels) and Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) were carried out with the Schlumberger array in order to assess the bedrock configuration and evaluate the extent of the aquifer, respectively. We compare both types of geophysical data with very shallow auger data, dug well data and outcrop information.

A seismic velocity contrast can differentiate two velocity layers separated by a single interface. The shale-dominated Miocene Bokabil Formation from the Upper Surma Group acts here as the bedrock or the lower layer. The depth of bedrock varies from 0.85 to 3.8m below the land surface. Three south-dipping thrust faults with vertical displacements from 0.8 to 1.8m can be seen in the bedrock elevation contour map, with very steep to vertical dip angles. Another two normal faults are also identified. 

Our interpretation of the resistivity show that the top seismic layer can be divided into two distinctive resistivity layers. Below an upper unsaturated zone, the aquifer is present from a depth of 0.25 to 2.3m. The resistivity value of this layer ranges from 60 to 200 Ωm. The bedrock can be identified below 1.43 to 4.18m, which is consistent with the seismic data. Variations in the resistivity value (>150 Ωm) show that water in the eastern part of Uttar Para, Pashim Para and Madhya Para should be fresher than all other areas of the island. However, a detailed lithological study is necessary to confirm the interpretation from the VES data. Further, we find that the aquifer is not continuous across St. Martin’s island because in some areas a silty clay layer is directly in contact with the bedrock.



Md. Golam Muktadir

Passionate about earth and environmental science, Md. Golam Muktadir completed his Bachelor’s degree in Geology and recently completed his Master’s degree in Geophysics at the Department of Geology, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. He joined DUEO (the Dhaka University Earth Observatory) and has been working with EOS as a Field Coordinator on the TREMBLE project (Temporary Receivers for Monitoring Bangladesh Earthquakes) since 2016. He was awarded a fully funded travel grant to attend the Chevron-SLS (Student Leadership Symposium) program and the 2017 SEG International Exposition and 87th Annual meeting in TX, USA. He has also been trained in RGNIYD TN, India on SDGs in 2018 and visited Bhutan as a Bangladeshi Student Delegate. Now he is also working with Vanderbilt University TN, USA and LDEO (Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory) of Columbia University as a Research Assistant on a project titled “Long Term Monitoring Research and Analysis of Bangladesh Coastal Zone (Sustainable Polders Adapted to Coastal Dynamics)’’  and seeking a PhD position to further his expertise and experience in geology and geophysics.


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Md. Golam Muktadir
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
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Seminar
Fire and Biodiversity: Feedbacks and interactions

Fire and Biodiversity: Feedbacks and interactions

Seminar
Speaker: Claire N. Foster
Date: Tue, 2019-08-20 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

Fire is a powerful ecological and evolutionary force. Yet, for most ecosystems, how fire interacts with other drivers of biodiversity remains poorly understood. In this seminar, I will use case studies from my recent research to illustrate how the effects of fire on biodiversity can be modified through interactions with other factors including herbivory, disturbance history and site characteristics. I will also discuss the often-overlooked side of fire-biodiversity relationships, and the focus of my current research; how biodiversity can itself influence fire.

Knowledge of the interactions between fire and other drivers will contribute to an improved predictive understanding of fire regimes and their ecological effects. This understanding will be critical to our ability to co-exist with fire in the context of global change.



Claire N. Foster

Claire is a Research Fellow at the Australian National University. She has a PhD in applied ecology (2016) and research interests in ecological disturbance and biodiversity conservation. Claire’s PhD investigated the interactive effects of fire and macropod browsing on biodiversity. Her current research further explores feedbacks between fire and biodiversity, focusing on the influence of animals on fire regimes.


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Claire N. Foster
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
 
Seminar
Mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing induced seismicity inferred from seismic tomography

Mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing induced seismicity inferred from seismic tomography

Seminar
Speaker: Yukuan Chen
Date: Thu, 2019-08-22 13:00 to 14:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

In recent years, small and moderate earthquakes induced by subsurface fluid injection have been reported worldwide. Two most conspicuous regions with a large number of induced earthquakes are mid-eastern United States and western Canada, which have a long history of wastewater disposal, enhanced oil recovery and shale gas hydraulic fracturing. In general, there are two mechanisms that are used to explain the induced seismicity due to hydraulic fracturing. The first mechanism is the activation of pre-existing faults caused by fluid diffusion, and the second one is due to the poroelastic effect of rock matrix. In this talk, two case studies in eastern China and western Canada will be presented. Earthquake relocation and seismic tomography results shown that fluid diffusion and fault activation is most likely to be the mechanisms of induced seismicity in these areas.



Yukuan Chen

Yukuan Chen received his B.Sc. (2013) and Ph.D (2019) in Geophysics from the University of Science and Technology of China. During his Ph.D study, He worked in the University of Calgary for one year as a visiting student. His research mainly focuses on developing novel methods to retrieve spatial and temporal seismic velocity changes induced by hydraulic fracturing.


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Yukuan Chen
13:00 to 14:00
 
 
Seminar
NTU first space science mission: The Atmospheric Coupling and Dynamics Explorer (ARCADE) micro-satellite

NTU first space science mission: The Atmospheric Coupling and Dynamics Explorer (ARCADE) micro-satellite

Seminar
Speaker: Amal Chandran
Date: Fri, 2019-08-23 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

In this presentation, I shall initially describe atmospheric coupling processes which connect the lower and upper atmosphere. Of particular interest are events like stratospheric sudden warmings  which completely reverse global mean flow in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The impacts of such events are felt along the whole atmosphere from the troposphere to the thermosphere and across hemispheres.  The second part of the talk will discuss the first space science mission out of NTU’s Satellite Research Centre.  SaRC is currently developing the Atmospheric Coupling and Dynamics Explorer (ARCADE) Mission, which is flying a hall effect thruster to progressively lower the altitude from an initial 500 km to 250 km. ARCADE is the fourth satellite in the INSPIRE (International Satellite Program in Research and Education) satellite series with joint development from IIST, India and NCU, Taiwan. ARCADE is a 27U spacecraft carrying an ionospheric plasma payload which will make ion temperature, velocity, density and electron temperature measurements. The satellite will be launched along with six other Singaporean satellites on a Singapore dedicated PSLV in 2020 into a near equatorial orbit. Since the final altitude is expected to be 250 km, the ARCADE/INSPIRESat-4 mission provides an excellent opportunity to study the equatorial ionosphere at low altitudes where the ion and electron density are much higher. The mission is expected to provide new information on plasma irregularities along the magnetic equator. The mission is also a technology demonstration of a hall effect thruster developed by French Startup 'Thrust Me'. Another addition to the mission is a Spatial Heterodyne Interferometer Infra-Red Imager for imaging the Mesosphere and Lower thermosphere region between 60-120 km. The SHI instrument will provide temperature information and help for understanding the dynamics of the equatorial MLT region. The presentation will cover the teams approaches to dealing with Very Low Earth Orbit (VLEO) and the challenges it poses.



Amal Chandran

Amal Chandran is an Assistant Professor at the school of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Nanyang Technological University. He is the Associate Director for Space Technology at the Satellite Research Centre at NTU. Amal’s research interests are in the field of instrumentation for Earth remote sensing and space weather monitoring on small satellite platforms. As Assistant Professor in the School of EEE, he is developing an undergraduate and graduate curriculum to teach spacecraft design and instrumentation. He is the principal investigator on the ARCADE (Atmospheric Coupling and Dynamics Explorer) mission, a 27U microsatellite and NTU’s Student Satellite Series the SCOOBI 3U nanosatellite mission, both of which are scheduled for flight in 2020. Amal serves as Principal Investigator of INSPIRESat-1, a small satellite scheduled for flight in 2019 being developed at the University of Colorado. Before joining NTU, Amal served as Project Manager at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and adjunct professor in Aerospace engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder, USA. Amal has supported multiple NASA cubesat and small explorer projects as project manager and engineer. He holds a PhD in Aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado. His PhD thesis involved working on NASA’s Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) Satellite mission to analyse wave propagation and dynamics in the Earth’s upper atmosphere.


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Amal Chandran
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
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Seminar
Volcanic ash: from formation to impact

Volcanic ash: from formation to impact

Seminar
Speaker: Katharine Cashman
Date: Wed, 2019-08-28 11:00 to 12:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

Real-time tracking and predictive modelling of volcanic ash dispersion, transport and deposition (VATD) rely largely on simple assumptions of ash properties. Real volcanic ash particles, however, vary in size, shape and density; measurement of these properties provides important insight into eruptive processes, and can be used to improve forecasts of ash hazards and impacts.



Katharine Cashman

Katharine Cashman studied for a BA degree in Geology and Biology at Middlebury College, Vermont, USA (1976), for an MSci (1st class Hons) at Victoria University, Wellington (New Zealand) and for a PhD in Earth Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA (1986). Her PhD project concerned applying theories of crystal size distributions to volcanic systems, and was supervised by Professor Bruce Marsh. She was an Assistant Professor at Princeton University, New Jersey, USA (1986-1991), and then an Associate (1991-1997) and Full (1997-present) at the University of Oregon. She went to Bristol in 2011 on a three year Research Professorship funded by the AXA insurance company. In December 2013 she was offered an AXA Endowed Chair at Bristol.  Katharine held several academic positions in her career: she was Head of the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon (2007-10) and President of the Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology (VGP) section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU; 2002-2004). In 2003 she was made a Distinguished Professor of the College of Arts and Sciences (Oregon), in 2007 she was made a Philip H. Knight Distinguished Professor of Natural Science (Oregon). Katharine received the AGU VGP Bowen Award in 2006, was elected a Fellow of the AGU in 2009 and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2012. She currently holds a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award.


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Katharine Cashman
11:00 to 12:00