Calendar

February 2019

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Seminar
Viral dynamics in aquatic systems: tales from Singapore coastal waters

Viral dynamics in aquatic systems: tales from Singapore coastal waters

Seminar
Speaker: Caroline Chénard
Date: Fri, 2019-02-01 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

With an estimate of 1030 viruses in the world’s ocean, viruses play important roles in biogeochemical and ecological processes. As significant agents of mortality, viruses facilitate nutrient cycling, influence microbial biodiversity and mediate microbial mortality and genetic transfer. Yet, current molecular techniques are just beginning to uncover the extent of viral diversity and how environmental conditions influence viral dynamics in aquatic systems. Singapore, is an ideal natural laboratory to investigate the viral communities response to a gradient of environmental factors as it is surrounded by two straits that differ greatly in oceanographic characteristics, nutrient availability and anthropogenic impact. In this talk, I will highlight approaches to study viruses in the environment. In addition, I will present how those methods are  currently used in a time-series program recently established in Singapore coastal waters.  



Caroline Chénard

Caroline Chénard is a Research Fellow at the Nanyang Technological University (Asian School of the Environment).  In 2014, she received her PhD in Biological Oceanography from the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) with an emphasis on aquatic viral ecology. Some of her PhD works include the discovery of new lineages of viruses infecting cyanobacteria and the use of DNA-Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) technique with metagenomic analysis to identify active viruses. After the obtaining her PhD, she moved to Singapore and joined the Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE) as a Research Fellow on a project investigating the microbial communities found in the air ecosystem. She joined the Asian School of the Environment in 2016 where she is focusing on understanding the viral control on phytoplankton dynamics in Singapore’s coastal waters.


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Caroline Chénard
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
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Seminar
Beyond the Community in Village Forest Management: A Governance Network Perspective

Beyond the Community in Village Forest Management: A Governance Network Perspective

Seminar
Speaker: Rachel Friedman
Date: Fri, 2019-02-08 16:00 to 18:00
Venue: ASE 3D Viz Laboratory Room (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

Community-based forest management, while provoking images of local and grassroots efforts, often involves a suite of organisations outside of communities working toward both social and ecological objectives. In Indonesia, the government has adopted a social forestry policy, seeking to promote both conservation and community access to production and protection forests. This talk will highlight a case study of community-based forest management in Indonesian Borneo, applying social network analysis to better understand the roles and relationships of different actors in carrying out Indonesia's social forestry policy. We examined how government, NGOs, donors, and private companies interact through information exchange, resource provision, and collaborative and coordinated activities, as well as, their involvement at the village level. The findings suggest lessons relevant to Indonesia's accelerated policy implementation and the expanding decentralised forest policies in other southeast Asian countries.



Rachel Friedman

University of Queensland

Rachel is a PhD candidate in the School of Biological Sciences and the Centre of Excellence in Environmental Decision-making (CEED) at the University of Queensland. Her research interests are broadly on the connections between biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human well-being within production (agricultural and forestry) landscapes, and the process and outcomes of land management decisions. Previously, she has worked on issues related to climate change, agriculture, and sustainable development policy and practice. She is currently supervised by Professor Kerrie Wilson, Associate Professor Jonathan Rhodes, and Dr. Elizabeth Law.


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Rachel Friedman
16:00 to 18:00
 
 
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Seminar
Stethoscope for the rainforests: Reimagining tropical forest conservation & ecology by using sound

Stethoscope for the rainforests: Reimagining tropical forest conservation & ecology by using sound

Seminar
Speaker: Zuzana Burivalova
Date: Fri, 2019-02-15 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

One of the foremost challenges we face in conservation is understanding how effective different conservation strategies are. Such effectiveness, especially in terms of biodiversity conservation, can be very difficult to measure, time consuming, and prone to many different biases. Bioacoustics, and specifically the recording and analysis of entire soundscapes, could be a suitable tool for monitoring animal biodiversity in the conservation areas as well as sustainably managed forests. I will show three examples of bioacoustics projects from tropical forests in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia, to illustrate the potential as well as the limitations of this new, promising conservation technology.



Zuzana Burivalova

Dr Zuzana Burivalova is a NatureNet Science Fellow, with Princeton University and The Nature Conservancy, and she will be joining the University of Wisconsin Madison as an assistant professor in the departments of Forest and Wildlife Ecology and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, in the Autumn of 2019. Zuzana is an ecologist and conservation scientist, working on biodiversity conservation in tropical forests, including in Indonesia. She also works with the environmental news organization Mongabay.com on a conservation effectiveness platform for tropical forests. She received her B.A. in Biological Sciences at Oxford University, MSc in Environmental Sciences at the University of Geneva and completed a PhD in tropical forest conservation and ecology at ETH Zurich.


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Zuzana Burivalova
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
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Seminar
Integrating Global Remote Sensing and Modeling Systems for Local Flood Prediction and Impact Assessment

Integrating Global Remote Sensing and Modeling Systems for Local Flood Prediction and Impact Assessment

Seminar
Speaker: Albert Kettner
Date: Tue, 2019-02-19 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

Flooding occurs on all continents and impacts over half a billion people every year worldwide. This is more than any other natural hazard and may increase to two billion by 2050. Occurring both in developed, as well as less developed countries, flooding is the most common hazard worldwide. Over the last decade, floods caused circa 100,000 fatalities with an additional 1.4 billion people directly affected and contributes to a global-average annual loss of US$104 billion. While some events are more seasonal – so easier to anticipate for, large floods tend to be more episodic which makes flooding difficult to predict. And although flooding can be very impactful for communities and countries, there hasn’t been a global effort to identify and determine global flood risk areas.

Furthermore, due to lack of objective knowledge of the impact of flooding after the fact, first relief agency assistance is often constrained and therefore less effective. However, these humanitarian catastrophes could be reduced with better transformation of existing observational and modeling technologies into information useful to local populations and decision makers. Most hydrological observational and modeling capabilities are global or regional, but products and services offered need to be local. First aid agencies require information at an order of magnitude finer spatial scales (for example for urban flooding) than what is typically available, e.g. flood maps that show affected regions.

Here I present new efforts to produce a state-of-the-art, globally-scoped, flood prediction, monitoring capabilities and risk evaluations platform that is interactive and includes high resolution flood information to better serve local needs. The platform builds upon already operational or quasi-operational NASA-supported global flood systems, including the DFO - Flood Observatory satellite-based hydrological gauging stations, UMD Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) and have these integrated with the European Commission’s GloFAS, and SAR-based high-resolution flood mapping. This all with the intension to have these data layers (flood forecasting, flood extent, and flood history) available to everybody.



Albert Kettner

Dr Kettner received a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering & Geosciences (2007) at Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands where he studied local and global fluvial supply dynamics to the coastal zone. With numerical models he investigates the impact of long-term climate and sea-level controls on riverine water and sediment fluxes and how these fluxes change over time. On shorter timescales, Kettner focuses on anthropogenic changes (e.g. altering of land use and placement of reservoirs) and how these impact water discharge and sediment flux. Dr. Kettner has been from the start (2006) intimitly involved in a numerical modeling facility, Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) at the University of Colorado, USA, which is the numerical modeling center supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation. He is an active advocate of free available, open source code of numerical models for Earth Surface processes and as such responsible for the various CSDMS repositories. He has been involved in DFO – Flood Observatory since 2011, currently housed at the Univerity of Colorado and is since 2018 the Director. DFO observes surface water changes by ulitizing satellite data. For DFO he designs and implements GIS frameworks to automate free available DFO product distribution for e.g. global flood inundation maps, and remotely sensed water gauging stations.


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Albert Kettner
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
 
 
Seminar
Preliminary scientific results from EOS field schools on the Sagaing, Mae Chan and Nam Ma faults, SE Asia.

Preliminary scientific results from EOS field schools on the Sagaing, Mae Chan and Nam Ma faults, SE Asia.

Seminar
Speaker: Ray Weldon
Date: Fri, 2019-02-22 16:00 to 17:00
Venue:

About the Event

In the winters of 2016, 2017, and 2018 a group of EOS scientists and visiting collaborators conducted 2-week-long field schools to train students to investigate active faults in mainland SE Asia. In addition to the educational value of these courses, that included students from up to 12 countries, they have generated key scientific insights on the activity of the Sagaing, Nam Ma (Myanmar) and Mae Chan (Thailand) faults, and valuable insights into how to study active faults in this environment. This talk will summarize some of these results and lessons learned, and focus a bit on the Mae Chan fault of northernmost Thailand.



Ray Weldon

Ray Weldon is Professor of Structural Geology and Neotectonics at the University of Oregon. Ray basically studies active faults in the field but works closely with seismologists, geodesists, geochronologists, and hazard and risk analysts to integrate field observations into models of how faults work and generate seismic hazard and risk. Ray and his students and colleagues have recently worked on the Cascadia Subduction Zone and the Basin and Range in Oregon, the San Andreas Fault in California, and fold and thrust belts in Alaska and the Kyrgyz Tien Shan. In pursuit of his conviction to make science practical, Ray serves on the Executive Committee of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF, the official source model for California earthquakes), the Steering Committee for the US National Seismic Hazard Map (that sets national building codes, among other things), and consults for a number of public and private entities on seismic hazards posed to nuclear power plants and dams. Ray teaches Oregon Geology and Summer Field Camp (in addition to specialized courses) and is most proud of having successfully graduated 22 MS and PhD students in his 27 years at Oregon.


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Ray Weldon
16:00 to 17:00
 
 
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Seminar
Climate change, ocean warming, land ice melt and sea level rise

Climate change, ocean warming, land ice melt and sea level rise

Seminar
Speaker: Anny Cazenave
Date: Tue, 2019-02-26 16:00 to 17:00
Venue: ASE 3D Visualisation Laboratory (N2-B1c-16c)

About the Event

It is now well established that the Earth‘s climate is warming and that the main reason is the accumulation inside the atmosphere of green house gases produced by anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion and change in land use. Global warming has already several visible consequences, in particular increase of the Earth’s mean temperature and of ocean heat content, melting of glaciers, and ice mass loss from the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets. Ocean warming causes thermal expansion of sea waters, hence sea level rise. Similarly, land ice melt that ultimately reaches the oceans, also causes sea level to rise. In this presentation, we summarize the most up-to-date knowledge about climate change and associated impacts on ocean warming, land ice melt and sea level rise. We highlight the contribution of space data, in particular satellite altimetry and space gravimetry, to measure ice sheet mass loss and sea level rise. We also discuss the various causes of sea level rise at global and regional scales and show that in terms of global average, we are now able to close the sea level budget. Finally, we discuss the importance of measuring sea level change at the coast, as well as the many complex processes at work in such regions (due to natural phenomena and anthropogenic forcing) that cause important adverse effects and significant vulnerability. 



Anny Cazenave

Anny Cazenave is a senior scientist at the ‘Laboratoire d’Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiale’, ‘Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales’, Toulouse, France, and director for Earth sciences at the International Space Science Institute/ISSI, Bern, Switzerland. Her research deals with the applications of space techniques to geosciences (geodesy, gravity and solid Earth geophysics; sea level variations from satellite altimetry and study of climatic causes; global water cycle and land hydrology from space; climate research). She published 250 articles in international journals and edited several books. She contributed as P.I. or co-I in several space missions in geodesy and oceanography. She served in several national and international scientific committees (e.g., World Climate Research Programme/WCRP, “Future Earth”, European Research Council/ERC Advanced Grants, US National Research Council/NRC), and was lead author of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Working Group I (4th and 5th Assessment reports). She is Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is member of the French Academy of sciences and foreign member of the American, Indian and Belgium academies of sciences.


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Anny Cazenave
16:00 to 17:00