Japan

Indonesia is known for extremely active plate tectonics and a series of gigantic earthquakes including the well-known 2004 Mw 9.3 earthquake.

What Caused the Strong Shaking of the Japan Mw 7.1 Earthquake

A Mw 7.1 earthquake struck Japan on 13 February 2021 at approximately 11:07pm (Japan local time). According to the United States Geological Survey, the earthquake occurred at a depth of about 50 kilometres (km) and about 70 km from the town of Namie, off the east coast of Honshu. The event was widely felt, injuring more than a hundred people and damaging some infrastructure.

Singapore Teams Up with Japan to Tackle Volcano Problems

Singapore, unlike Japan, does not have any volcanoes. However, our little sunny island is in proximity to 127 active volcanoes in Indonesia and 53 in the Philippines. This means that both Singapore and Japan could be significantly affected by different types of volcanic hazards, making research on volcanoes an important area of study for both countries. Here’s why.

Can the Updip Limit of Frictional Locking on Megathrusts Be Detected Geodetically? Quantifying the Effect of Stress Shadows on Near‐Trench Coupling

To better understand the earthquakes and associated tectonic setting and ground shaking, we study earthquakes in Southeast Asia, the most seismically active region on the earth.

  • EOS News
18 Jun 2018

In the video below, Assistant Professor Wei Shengji, Principal Investigator at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, suggests that the earthquake tha

How did the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Change Earth’s Rotation?

The devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake in northeastern Japan was a record-breaker on many levels. The magnitude-9.0 quake was Japan’s largest recorded and the world’s fourth biggest earthquake since 1900. Most terribly, it unleashed a 39-metre high tsunami, killing almost 16,000 people and causing a nuclear meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

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