Myanmar

Folklore and Farmers: The Role of Non-Scientists in Active Fault Research in Myanmar and Thailand

“We scientists usually think we know everything,” said Dr Wang Yu, a Research Fellow at the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS), “but when we go into the field, we start to realise that actually farmers have most of the important knowledge about the land, and that we are just visitors with lots to learn.”

A View from the Trenches: The 2017 Earthquake Geology Training and Field Camp in Myanmar and Thailand

"One of the things that first made me interested in geology was hearing about the number of places that geologists travel to for work." Tim Dawson, a Senior Engineering Geologist at California Geological Survey, reflects on the perks of being a geologist, and describes his most recent adventure in the trenches in northern Myanmar and Thailand during an earthquake geology training course.

Covered in Golden Dust: Learning to Survey Active Faults in Myanmar

In February 2017, scientists from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) led an earthquake geology training camp in Myanmar and Thailand. The course was designed to allow scientists to share their knowledge about active fault trenching and paleoseismology with geology students who may not have had prior field experience.

 

We propose to install 30 broadband seismometers to cover the seismic gap on the Sagaing fault and the neighbouring region, which is one of the most populated areas in Myanmar. The seismic data will be used to better understand the seismotectonic setting in the region. The proposed works include waveform modelling for earthquake focal mechanism and crustal and slab velocity structure, and determining micro-seismicity location, locking depth and the slip rate on the fault. These will be key for seismic hazard estimation and preparedness in Myanmar.

We propose to look in detail at five years of data that have been recorded by 24 continuous GPS stations in the Myanmar-­India-­Bangladesh-­Bhutan (MIBB) network, and extend their coverage with InS

Observing a fault in a layered outcrop, Myanmar.

The Mingun Pagoda near Mandalay in central Myanmar. The foundation of this unfinished Pagoda is heavily damaged by the 1839 Ava earthquake.

Surveying the living corals in a tidal pool, Kyaukpyu, Myanmar, year 2011.

  • Earth In The News
24 Aug 2016
  • Earth In The News
14 Apr 2016

On 13 April 2016, a magnitude-6.9 earthquake struck northwest Myanmar.

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