Sumatra

In collaboration with the volcano team at EOS, undergraduate students from the Universitas Negeri Padang assist in and learn from the peat coring process during a field trip in Sumatra.

Coring equipment, such as this Russian Peat Borer, are designed to capture organic rich sediments many metres underground.

An EOS observation station is installed on Mount Marapi in Indonesia. Such observation systems may house a seismometer, tiltmeter, and infrasound instruments.

The Child of Krakatoa Awakes

At approximately 9:30pm local time (2:30pm GMT) on the 22 December 2018, a tsunami struck Indonesia’s Sunda Strait, which lies between the islands of Java and Sumatra, claiming over 430 lives. According to Indonesia’s disaster agency there are at least 1,500 injured, over 120 people still missing, and around 12,000 people have been displaced.

On a field trip to Simeulue Island off the coast of Sumatra, Prof. Kerry Sieh studying microatoll corals to put together a history of uplift caused by earthquakes in the region.

The final goal of the on-going three-years project is to develop a process-based, coupled hydrodynamic and morphological model for simulating sediment transport and deposit under tsunami waves.

To better understand the earthquakes and associated tectonic setting and ground shaking, we propose to study earthquakes in Southeast Asia, the most seismically active region on the earth, with a s

Rupture durations and other physical processes of tsunami earthquakes show strong variations and the underlying mechanisms of both earthquake and tsunami generations have not been understood.

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