Disaster Analytics for Society Lab - David Lallemant

The Disaster Analytics for Society Lab (DASL) is focused on using novel technologies and analytical methods to understand, model, and predict the impact of natural disasters on society, and develop tools to promote resilient cities. We combine methods from spatial statistics, risk/reliability analysis, machine learning, remote sensing and probabilistic modelling to develop information systems on pre-disaster risk, post-disaster impact and long-term disaster recovery. Our research has a particular focus on cities and urban regions as they represent extremes in terms of potential casualties and losses, and require more complex analyses due to their dynamics in terms of populations, infrastructure systems and networks. Beyond modelling and analysis, we investigate the communication of uncertainty as it relates to disaster risk and the translation of resilience science into policy.

The DASL is highly interdisciplinary and collaborative. Among these collaborators are the Stanford Urban Resilience Initiative, the World Bank, the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) Innovations Lab, Google, the Natural Capital Project, the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, and others.

Main research interests include:

  • Dynamic urban risk modelling and forecasting
  • Quantitative models of resilience
  • Big data analytics for rapid post-disaster impact assessment
  • Data-driven models of urban vulnerability
  • Transdisciplinary design research
  • Nature-based risk-reduction solutions

Blog

08 Oct 2021

Forests help us in many ways. They preserve biodiversity, combat climate change, and even protect us from floods. However, quantifying the value of these benefits has been a challenge...

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The occurrence of natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions and floods can be seen as extreme events. By nature of their occurrence, we usually have far more data on common, non-extreme events than on rarer, extreme events.

As the global sea level rises, coastal cities face increasing flood impacts.

Many problems in earth and environmental sciences and engineering involve identifying multiple source characteristics of a process based on observations of the outcomes of that process.  These are commonly referred to as source identificatio

Blog

08 Oct 2021

Forests help us in many ways. They preserve biodiversity, combat climate change, and even protect us from floods. However, quantifying the value of these benefits has been a challenge...