Spotlight: Nepal

Nepal Seismotectonics

One major issue addressed here is to know whether the recent great earthquakes on the MFT ruptured the surface or not. EOS confirmed with 14C dating that the rupture of the 1934 Bihar-Nepal earthquake (Mw 8.2) reached the surface. It is a major breakthrough as the hitherto entrenched consensus had been that the 20th century catastrophic events along the Himalayan Frontal Thrust were blind. 

Spotlight: Indonesia

Sumatran Fault Monitoring (SuMo) Campaign GPS project

Studies focused on tectonic activity along the Sumatran Fault zone (SFZ), which traverses the entire 1900-km length of Sumatra, are still lacking. The SFZ is segmented and the slip rate varies for each segment, but rates are poorly known, particularly at the southern end of the SFZ.

Spotlight: Myanmar

Annual Report 2017 - Research

Home to more than 50 million people, Myanmar is shaped like a giant kite with a long tail that sweeps down along the Andaman Sea.

Beneath the surface, invisible dangers affect Myanmar’s growing population, making it one of the most earthquake-prone countries in the world. In the north, mountain ranges mark the northeast limit of the Indian tectonic plate, which has been colliding with the southern edge of the Eurasian plate for tens of millions of years. It is this interaction that has helped push...

Spotlight: Sumatra

Where Should We Rebuild After a Disaster?

In 2004, a devastating tsunami struck coastlines around the Indian Ocean. In a study of the long-term recovery of the city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, we found that reconstruction aid provided mostly near the coast, combined with many people's preferences to move to safer areas instead, has had the unintended consequence whereby the poor have become disproportionately exposed to coastal hazards.

Spotlight: Myanmar

Today's Quake in Myanmar is a Reminder of How Active the Sagaing Fault is

Very early in the morning on Friday, 12 January 2018, Myanmar was struck by a magnitude-6.0 earthquake. Residents in the two capital cities, Yangon and Nay Pyi Taw, were able to feel the quake that had originated 40 kilometres west of the Sagaing Fault in Central Myanmar.

In the video below, Dr Wang Yu, a Research Fellow at the Earth Observatory of Singapore,...

Spotlight: Nepal

Reducing Natural Disaster Risk Across Asia

Asia and the Pacific are most at risk from natural disasters, according to a report from the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction. More than 90 million people worldwide were affected by natural disasters in 2015. Asia is the world’s most disaster-prone continent, with 152 out of the 346 reported disasters worldwide. This isn’t surprising, given that it is both geologically active and the most populous region on Earth. In the last few decades, earthquakes,...

Spotlight: Nepal

Post-Disaster Damage Assessments: Room for Improvement?

On 25 April 2015, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, destroying buildings and infrastructure across 31 of Nepal’s 70 districts. Approximately 9,000 people lost their lives to the earthquake that day, 22,000 suffered from injuries, and eight million were affected. I arrived in Kathmandu one week after the quake to support the government of Nepal in various response and recovery activities.

Spotlight: Asia

People-Coral-Mentawai

People–Coral–Mentawai is a documentary short about the methods used by scientists at the Earth Observatory of Singapore to develop a timeline of earthquakes in the West Sumatra region.

Spotlight: Indonesia

EarthGirl 2
Earth Girl 2: Preparing for the Tsunami

Inspired by the challenges faced by coastal communities throughout Asia and Southeast Asia, Earth Girl 2 is a casual strategy game that teaches players how to prepare for and increase their odds of surviving a tsunami.

Spotlight: Nepal

Annual Report 2016
Nepal is the home to stunning landscapes and the tallest mountain range in the world. It is also the site of the largest active continental thrust fault called the Main Frontal Thrust. The collision of the Indian subcontinent and the Eurasian plate, which began about 50 million years ago, is still building the tallest mountains in the world and has produced many large, catastrophic earthquakes along the way.

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