Earth Observatory Blog

Submitted on 03 May 2018 by:

Some eruptions are so large, and discharge so much magma (molten rock), that the roof of the magma chamber can no longer support itself. When the roof collapses, it forms a big hole in the ground called a caldera. One such volcano is Santorini, in Greece, whose distinctive ring shape was formed by multiple caldera collapses.

We studied the Cape Riva eruption of Santorini, an eruption of at least 10 km3 of magma —enough to cover all of Singapore to a depth of at least 14 m. We wanted to know how long it takes to assemble the magma that eventually gets erupted at the surface in a caldera-forming eruption like the Cape Riva. Do these magma reservoirs slowly grow over tens of thousands of years, or are they emplaced more rapidly? Knowing what...