Earth Observatory Blog

Submitted on 22 Jun 2018 by:

Tidal wetlands in the contiguous US can store roughly 800 million tons of carbon in their soils. That is the latest estimate from a team of over 30 scientists, including Professor Benjamin Horton and Dr Tim Shaw from the Earth Observatory of Singapore and the Asian School of the Environment, published on 21 June 2018 in Nature Scientific Reports

Wetlands are one of humanity’s best defenses against climate change. Besides shielding cities from extreme weather like hurricanes, wetlands can also store massive amounts of carbon — up to 10 times faster than upland forests, according to some estimates. This carbon, known as “blue carbon,” has become a buzzword among those looking to protect the coasts from the...

Submitted on 11 Jan 2018 by:

In December 2017, the city of New Orleans welcomed 22,500 of the world’s leading geophysical science experts for the annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference. Each year, AGU brings together the earth, atmospheric, space, and hydrologic science communities to share their research, exchange ideas, and meet colleagues and friends. The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) sent a group of representatives to join the activity at AGU 2017.

Our researchers conducted 21 oral presentations and two workshops, with topics ranging from the recurrence interval of tsunamis in the 7,400 years before the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, to how music can be used to communicate geoscience in films, videos and interactive games. 

We also exhibited 29 posters throughout...

Submitted on 24 Oct 2017 by:

Our Earth is warming. In fact, the planet’s average temperature has risen by 0.6°C over the past century, and is projected to rise another 2 to 6°C over the next hundred years. Small changes in the average temperature of the planet can translate to large and potentially dangerous shifts in climate and weather.

The evidence is clear. Rising global temperatures have been accompanied by notable changes in weather and climate. Many places have seen changes in rainfall, resulting in more floods, droughts, or intense rain, as well as more frequent and severe heat waves. The planet's oceans and glaciers have also experienced major changes – oceans are warming and becoming more acidic, ice caps are melting, and sea levels are rising.

Sea-level rise is one of the more...

Submitted on 24 Jan 2017 by:

Last December, a big contingent from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) travelled to the American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference, the largest gathering of earth and space scientists in the world. Around 24,000 people descended upon San Francisco to catch up with colleagues, present their research, and learn about the latest advancements in their fields. 

The Community Engagement Office set up a booth to share our work with conference-goers. EOS professors, research fellows, and graduate students graciously volunteered to speak with curious visitors about their experiences and research in Singapore.

The EOS wine reception kicked off the week. Late into the night, EOS...

Submitted on 22 Dec 2016 by:

In March, we kicked off the EOS Institutional Blog. Our goal – create a space for you to learn more about what our scientists and teams are up to. As I look back on the stories we shared covering new research, current hazardous activity in the region, and outreach events, I’m thrilled to have the Institutional Blog as a reminder of the great work we’ve done and the fruitful year we’ve had.

Publications, workshops, awards, marine research and a lot of seismic activity kept us steeped in stories. This year was particularly active throughout the region with more than nine major earthquakes garnering our attention and interest.  From the M 6.2 earthquake near the Java Trench to the...