Overview

One of the driving aims of the research group is to make the coastlines of Asia safer places to live, work and play. Records of past coastal hazards events can help predict impacts and likelihood of similar future events. We also aim to be able to use the information on past coastal change to provide an idea of what might be expected in the future, and thereby to inform policy and planning decisions.

Globally, studies of the sedimentation and geomorphic effects of tsunami and storm surge have gained increasing popularity and recognition since the Indian Ocean Tsunami of December 2004 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005 demonstrated the vulnerability of coastal communities the world over, and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Tsunami reminded us that we can never be too prepared for such events.

Since its inception in 2010, the lab has made significant contributions to coastal change research around the world, has been involved with developing new approaches to reconstructing tsunami and hurricane hazards, and has made major contributions to improved planning and management of the human activities in the coastal environment.

Resources

Surveying Damage After Typhoon Hato
Introduction to the Southeast Asia SEA-Level (SEA2) Program

Facilities

Coastal Lab Field Equipment
Geochemistry Laboratories
MC-ICP-MS
Paleo-environments Lab

Research Interests

Coastal Hazards

Meteorologists often describe Southeast Asia as the “Maritime Continent”, which underlies its susceptibility to coastal hazards. The rapid demographic growth in this region is a factor that aggravates the risk, as most of the new populations tend to settle on the shores where economic activity is concentrated. Hence coastal hazards are a crucial research field in the region.

Oceanographic and Inundation Modelling

Sedimentary records from historical and paleo-events are used to model storm surge or tsunami inundations in coastal areas. Such modelling is crucial for coastal hazard assessment and risk mitigation.

Sea Level History

Since the 19th century tide gauges measurements record sea-level changes and since 40 years satellites enabled a global and accurate sea-level record. However, researchers need sea-level estimates on a longer-term to validate climate and tectonic models and to infer the local effects of climate change on sea-level rise.

Environmental Change

The coastal lab is involved in the study of environmental change and coastal hazards all over Southeast Asia. Sedimentary records of the South China Sea coastline are analysed to develop an understanding of the geological, geomorphological, and climatic history of the region.
 

Recent Publications

Year 2022

Year 2021

Interacting effects of land-use change and natural hazards on rice agriculture in the Mekong and Red River deltas in Vietnam

Kai Wan Yuen, Adam Switzer, Janice S.H. Lee, Paul Teng, Tang Thi Hanh, & Vu Duong Quynh

Year 2021

Environmental DNA signatures distinguish between tsunami and storm deposition in overwash sand

Wenshu Yap, Adam Switzer, Chris Gouramanis, Dale Dominey-Howes, Ezequiel Marzinelli, Federico M. Lauro, et al.

The Team

Adam SWITZER

Adam SWITZER

Principal Investigator

Constance CHUA Ting

Constance CHUA Ting

Research Fellow

Masashi WATANABE

Masashi WATANABE

Research Fellow

Abang NUGRAHA

Abang NUGRAHA

Research Fellow

YAN Yu Ting

YAN Yu Ting

PhD Student

XU Jia Min

XU Jia Min

PhD Student

Elaine TAN Hui Zhi

Elaine TAN Hui Zhi

PhD Student

PUAH Jun Yu

PUAH Jun Yu

PhD Student

KUMAR Rahul

KUMAR Rahul

PhD Student

Clair Elaine Jerusha DEVAN

Clair Elaine Jerusha DEVAN

Assistant Manager/Secretary

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